1. Recent Articles

    1. 2020 started with murder hornets, ends with new species of wild bee

      2020 started with murder hornets, ends with new species of wild bee

      A year that featured murder hornets is ending off with more positive insect news, as a new species of wild bee was discovered right as its natural habitat was being rehabilitated north of Netanya.

       Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem announced on Tuesday that they had discovered a new species of wild bee while researching the effects of restoration efforts of a rare habitat in the Sharon region on bee populations. The findings were published in November in the scientific journal Belgian Journal of Entomology.

      The researchers say they believe that the species is likely unique to the sands ...

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    2. Stormy weather ahead: pollution found to cause fierce gales in coastal cities

      Stormy weather ahead: pollution found to cause fierce gales in coastal cities

      A combination of city-generated heat and pollution in tropical coastal cities has been found to significantly increase precipitation in those cities. These results were reported last week by American scientists. Their study looked into factors causing the intensification of storms hitting Houston, Texas, which lies in the most tropical area in the U.S. According to Prof. Daniel Rosenfeld from the Hebrew University, who participated in the study, this combination apparently causes more fierce storms along the coastal plain in Israel as well, although to a lesser extent than in tropical regions.

       Climate scientists noticed a long time ago that ...
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    3. Ancient oil lamp workshop, now at Israel Museum, shows the way we once lit

      Ancient oil lamp workshop, now at Israel Museum, shows the way we once lit

      A complete rare, early Islamic-era oil lamp workshop from ancient Tiberias on the shores of the Sea of Galilee has gone on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

      Ten complete lamp molds, a kiln, and several intact, unused oil lamps dating from circa the mid-7th century to the 11th century were found under debris from a series of earthquakes during excavations this summer, conducted by the Hebrew University Institute for Archaeology’s Israel Archaeological Services.

      The complete assemblage of the workshop offers “a rare glimpse into work processes in our area in ancient times,” said Liza Lurie, the Israel ...

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    4. Israeli researchers discover how to lengthen life of solar panels

      Israeli researchers discover how to lengthen life of solar panels
      In a move toward upgrading solar power technologies, a team of Israeli researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has developed an eco-friendly way to lengthen the lifespan of perovskite-based solar cells.
      The researchers designed a new structure to hold the cells, which allows for the easy removal and replacement of perovskite, a light-sensitive material that degrades over time. The process allows for the full restoration of a panel’s photovoltaic capacities and essentially enables it to be recycled.
      Perovskite is a mineral structure that has the capacity to absorb light and is used as a semiconductor. The growing field ...
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    5. One llama’s antibodies, analyzed in Jerusalem, may help ‘millions’ through COVID

      One llama’s antibodies, analyzed in Jerusalem, may help ‘millions’ through COVID

      Antibodies from a single llama that were analyzed in a Jerusalem lab could be replicated and help “millions” of coronavirus patients, scientists say.

      Dina Schneidman-Duhovny of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has examined the qualities of dozens of antibodies from a llama called Wally, and identified which would best fight the coronavirus in humans.

      The best candidates have been tested in vitro by her US-based colleagues with live coronavirus and human cells, and appear to significantly reduce the virus’s ability to infect cells.

      As the llama antibodies are much smaller than human antibodies — they are often dubbed “nanobodies” — they ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    6. Glowing engineered bacteria point out explosive landmines

      Glowing engineered bacteria point out explosive landmines

      Researchers who discovered how to utilize fluorescent E. coli bacteria to locate landmines have recently further mutated them so that they are now both more sensitive and emit a glow visible to the naked eye, eliminating the need to scan the ground using laser light beams.

      In 2017, researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem molecularly engineered E. coli to emit a fluorescent light upon coming in contact with explosive vapors accumulated in the soil above landmines. This light was recorded using a laser-based scanning system so the mines could be located safely from afar.

      Now, in a study published ...

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    7. Climate research multidisciplinary center opens at Hebrew U.

      Climate research multidisciplinary center opens at Hebrew U.
      The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which considers climate issues as some of the most significant scientific problems the world currently faces, established a climate research center, the Hebrew University Center for Climate Science (HUCS).
       
      The new center, headed by the two researchers Prof. Hezi Gildor and Dr. Uri Adam, will make it possible to deal with the challenges of the climate crisis in the Middle East region. The center's members will focus on building an up-to-date and accurate regional climate model.
       
      The center will allow ideas, research and interdisciplinary brainstorming around the climate issue to collaborate with the Meteorological ...
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    8. Could octopuses have more than one brain? - Hebrew U. study

      Could octopuses have more than one brain? - Hebrew U. study

      A new Hebrew University study recently examined the possibility that octopuses, known to be among the most intelligent of invertebrates, could have multiple brains.

      The full intelligence of an octopus is not fully understood, however it is known that they have the largest nervous system among invertebrates – even larger than some vertebrates – with more nerve cells not in the brain itself but rather in its body and the tentacles.
      The question of multiple brains is one that many researchers are still investigating. 
      The collection of sensory information and the ability to process it, learn from it and respond accordingly, is ...
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    9. Studies show pomegranate supplement slows neurodegenerative diseases

      Studies show pomegranate supplement slows neurodegenerative diseases

      Everybody knows that the pomegranate is a superfood. One of the seven native fruits of Israel, pomegranates are packed with health-promoting and healing antioxidants and vitamins.

      Now, an Israeli supplement derived from pomegranate seed oil has proven helpful in improving cognitive function in multiple sclerosis patients experiencing cognitive difficulties associated with the disease.

      Prof. Dimitrios Karussis, the internationally renowned director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center at Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem, found significant improvement in learning ability and text comprehension, word recall and categorization in 30 patients involved in a groundbreaking study of the patented GranaGard supplement.

      This is ...

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    10. Yissum Spinouts Raise $79 million in H1 2020 Despite Coronavirus Uncertainty - PRNewswire

      Yissum Spinouts Raise $79 million in H1 2020 Despite Coronavirus Uncertainty - PRNewswire

      Startups from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem raised $79 million in the first half of 2020, Yissum, the technology transfer company of the Hebrew University announced today.  Despite the continuing global uncertainty caused by the coronavirus and ongoing lockdowns around the world, 14 Yissum spinouts raised tens of millions of dollars in early-stage funding rounds.  

       Investments were made in companies in the cleantech, agriculture, and foodtech sectors as well as in life science, AI, and education.  Despite the fact that VC investments in the US  and Europe were down, the number of VC deals in Israel reached an all-time record ...

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    11. Nano-engineered pomegranate oil holds hope for brain disease, study shows

      Nano-engineered pomegranate oil holds hope for brain disease, study shows

      A Israeli study has found that multiple sclerosis patients taking a nano-engineered nutritional supplement made out of pomegranate oil showed “significant cognitive improvement” after just three months.

      The small-scale study of 30 patients was conducted at the Multiple Sclerosis Center at Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital in Jerusalem by Prof. Dimitrios Karussis, director of the center and a senior neurologist. Results showed that patients taking the supplement witnessed an average 12 percent improvement in learning ability and text comprehension, word recall and categorization, in the three months of treatment.

      The researchers are now writing up the findings to submit them to ...

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    12. Ancient scepter found in south may have been part of life-sized 'divine statue' - The Times of Israel

      Ancient scepter found in south may have been part of life-sized 'divine statue' - The Times of Israel

      An approximately 3,200-year-old scepter found at a biblical site in southern Israel may be the first physical evidence of life-sized “divine statues” used in Canaanite rituals, according to a new report.

      Yosef Garfinkel, an archaeology professor at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, wrote in the academic journal Antiquity that the scepter, which was made from bronze and coated in silver, was discovered inside the cellar of a Canaanite temple at Lachish.

      He linked the scepter, which looks like a spatula, to a scepter found at Hatzor in the north, as well as to a small figurine found at the site ...

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    13. Special vessels show Jewish continuity in Israel after Roman destruction

      Special vessels show Jewish continuity in Israel after Roman destruction

      New research offers insights on how Jewish life continued in the Land of Israel after the destruction of the Temple and of Jerusalem at the hands of the Romans.

       

      The use of chalkstones vessels, very common among the Jewish population during the Second Temple Period, did not stop with the destruction of city in the second century CE as previously thought, but continued in the Galilee, the new center of Jewish life, for at least another two centuries, a paper published in the May issue of the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) documented.

      Several types and ...

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      Mentions: Humanities
    14. Why dance? From prehistory to the Bible, scholar offers answers

      Why dance? From prehistory to the Bible, scholar offers answers

      In the 1990s, leading Israeli scholar Yosef Garfinkel, head of the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, led several seasons of excavations at the Neolithic site of Sha’ar Hagolan in northern Israel. Among other things, the researchers uncovered several clay figurines depicting the deity Mother goddess presenting unnaturally elongated heads. For their artistic qualities, the figurines were exhibited in the most important museums around the world. For Garfinkel, they represented the spark which prompted him to investigate a new field of research, the history of human dance.

      “While I was trying to understand more about their ...

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      Mentions: Bible Humanities
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  2. AFHU Blog

    1. Bonus Time? Better Hope the Boss is NOT Your Friend, Study Finds

      Bonus Time? Better Hope the Boss is NOT Your Friend, Study Finds

      A manager has to give a bonus to one of two equally deserving employees, one of whom is his friend. A judge in a high school debating competition has to decide which of two finalists to vote for, one of whom is a student from her alma mater. A coach has to decide which of two players should start in the championship game, one of whom is the coach's niece. It is well known that people show favoritism toward those close to them, such as family, friends, or in-group members. 

      However, a recent study published in the Journal of ...

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      Mentions: Humanities
    2. Hebrew University Researchers Discover Promising Treatment for Aggressive Brain Tumors

      Hebrew University Researchers Discover Promising Treatment for Aggressive Brain Tumors

      Glioblastoma is a serious and incurable brain cancer. Patients who receive this diagnosis typically have 11-20 months to live. One of the main difficulties in treating this cancer is that its cells quickly build up a resistance to chemotherapy. In the upcoming issue of Nucleic Acids Research, Professor Rotem Karni and his team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Institute for Medical Research share promising results for a new glioblastoma treatment with the potential to improve and extend patients’ lives.

      As part of their research, Karni and PhD student Maxim Mogilevsky designed a molecule that inhibits glioblastoma tumor growth ...

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    3. See all AFHU Blog articles
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    Bonus Time? Better Hope the Boss is NOT Your Friend, Study Finds Hebrew University Researchers Discover Promising Treatment for Aggressive Brain Tumors 2020 started with murder hornets, ends with new species of wild bee Stormy weather ahead: pollution found to cause fierce gales in coastal cities Ancient oil lamp workshop, now at Israel Museum, shows the way we once lit Israeli researchers discover how to lengthen life of solar panels One llama’s antibodies, analyzed in Jerusalem, may help ‘millions’ through COVID Glowing engineered bacteria point out explosive landmines Climate research multidisciplinary center opens at Hebrew U. Could octopuses have more than one brain? - Hebrew U. study Israel's decision to restart schools a cautionary tale - Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Studies show pomegranate supplement slows neurodegenerative diseases
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