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    97-120 of 186 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 »
    1. QueenB takes a byte out of gender gap to promote diversity in tech

      QueenB takes a byte out of gender gap to promote diversity in tech

      As Israel faces a shortage of some 10,000 engineers and programmers in the coming decade, three Jerusalem-area students in the tech field noticed an even bigger scarcity in their classrooms and workplaces: women. “We’re frustrated that not enough girls are involved in the computer science field,” said Noga Mann, a Hebrew University student and a co-founder of QueenB. Yasmin Dunsky and Neta Moses, and later, Mann, wanted to address the gender disparity as early as possible. They created QueenB, a mentorship and training program for girls of middle-school age, to support their interest in computer science and instill ...

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    2. German-Israeli Accelerator Speeds Up Cybersecurity Innovation and Collaboration

      German-Israeli Accelerator Speeds Up Cybersecurity Innovation and Collaboration

      November 6, 2017 — A new initiative to accelerate cybersecurity innovation and collaboration between Germany and Israel was launched in Jerusalem.

      The Hessian Israeli Partnership Accelerator for Cybersecurity (HIPA) brings together top talents in cybersecurity from Israel and Germany to jointly work on cybersecurity projects in areas such as network technologies, internet infrastructure, and software security. The overarching goal is to trigger the creation of innovation and businesses in cybersecurity in Israel and Germany.

      HIPA connects the participants with entrepreneurs, researchers, mentors, customers and influencers, and the in-depth technical and business training provided is expected to give the start-ups emerging from ...

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    3. U of Illinois signs research deal with Israeli university - Chicago Tribune

      U of Illinois signs research deal with Israeli university - Chicago Tribune

      The University of Illinois has signed a research partnership with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. 

      U of I President Timothy Killeen signed the pact Tuesday during Gov. Bruce Rauner's trip to Israel this week. Rauner says the collaboration will boost Illinois' economy.

      Officials say Hebrew University has more than 100 research centers and 7,000 patents to its credit. They say like the U of I, it's routinely ranked among the top universities globally.

      Killeen says Hebrew University is "a global leader in producing the workforce and innovation of tomorrow through world-class programs."

      Asher Cohen is Hebrew University ...

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    4. Joint Israeli-US research distinguishes cancerous cells from healthy ones

      Joint Israeli-US research distinguishes cancerous cells from healthy ones

      A protein “switch” that activates the immune system to attack cancer cells when it detects signs of the disease has been developed by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

      The switch stimulates an immune response only when it detects the cancer cells, without harming other healthy tissues, the researchers said.

      The important discovery has just been published in the journal Cell.

      Immunotherapy is now seen as having great potential in the research effort to develop drugs against a wide variety of cancers. Despite this success, the use of immunotherapy remains limited due to ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    5. CIITECH Sponsors Research Project on Cannabis-based Therapy for Asthma at the Multidisciplinary

      CIITECH Sponsors Research Project on Cannabis-based Therapy for Asthma at the Multidisciplinary

      LONDON and TEL AVIV, Israel, October 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ 

      CIITECH, a UK-Israel cannabis biotech startup, announced today that it has selected to sponsor a research project with the Multidisciplinary Center on Cannabinoid Research of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, focused on the therapeutic benefit of cannabis for the treatment of asthma.

      CIITECH selected to award research funding, through a non-exclusive grant competition, to the collaborative work of Professor Raphael Mechoulam, a pioneer in the field of cannabis research credited for the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, and his colleague, Professor Francesca Levi-Schaffer, a global expert in asthma research. Together, these ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    6. Yissum Announces New Platform for 3D Printing of Personalized Food

      Yissum Announces New Platform for 3D Printing of Personalized Food

      Yissum Research Development Company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the technology-transfer company of the Hebrew University, introduced today a novel technology for the 3D printing of personalized food based on nano-cellulose, a natural, edible, calorie-free fiber. 

      Prof. Oded Shoseyov from the Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture and Prof. Ido Braslavsky, Director, Inter-Faculty Biotechnology Program and Head of B.S. Program at the Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science, and Nutrition, both at the Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food, and Environment, of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, developed a novel platform, based on ...

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    7. We can design driverless cars that cannot cause an accident

      We can design driverless cars that cannot cause an accident

      The rules of the road today are all focused around one key element: drivers. Licensing, insurance, traffic laws — everything assumes vehicles are operated under the control of a human. 

      For driverless vehicles, this presents a dilemma: How can you tell which car is at fault in an accident? Should we license and insure owners or manufacturers or the cars themselves? More importantly: How can self-driving and human-driven cars co-exist safely?

      Before society will welcome autonomous cars en masse, we must answer those questions — and others — with certainty. People have expressed apprehension about self-driving vehicles and are unlikely to accept them ...

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    8. Low-Tech Bubbe, High-Tech Mission

      Low-Tech Bubbe, High-Tech Mission

      So you’re a grandmother whose kids and grandkids apparently are too busy to keep in touch — how do you remind them? Handwritten notes. Email messages. Guilt-laden phone calls. Or, since late last month, a new app touted on the revamped website of the American Friends of the Hebrew University. A video on the website features an octogenarian identified as Judith Cohen who describes the “Would It Kill You to Call?” app she’s developed that will send periodic cell phone reminders to delinquent members of the mishpocha. “Do they ever remember to call their bubbe?” she asks. After seven ...

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    9. Israel: land of milk, honey and medical cannabis

      Israel: land of milk, honey and medical cannabis

      In August, a joint feasibility committee of the Health and Finance ministries submitted a recommendation that Israel open its booming medical marijuana business to international exports. The market could be worth as much as $4 billion a year in revenue. In the expectation that the proposal will be approved by legislators, an Israel company – Breath of Life Pharma (BOL) – is positioning itself to become the world’s largest medical cannabis facility. BOL’s new production, research and development campus in central Israel has a 35,000-square-foot plant, an 8,000-square-foot storage room, 30,000 square feet of grow rooms and ...

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    10. Cleveland Clinic researchers find link between bacterial imbalances and breast cancer

      Cleveland Clinic researchers find link between bacterial imbalances and breast cancer

      October 5, 2017, Cleveland: In a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered differences in the bacterial composition of breast tissue of healthy women vs. women with breast cancer. The research team has discovered for the first time that healthy breast tissue contains more of the bacterial species Methylobacterium, a finding which could offer a new perspective in the battle against breast cancer. Bacteria that live in the body, known as the microbiome, influence many diseases. Most research has been done on the "gut" microbiome, or bacteria in the digestive tract. Researchers have long suspected that a "microbiome" exists ...

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    11. How to Cope With Tragedy When You Have Anxiety

      How to Cope With Tragedy When You Have Anxiety

       

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    12. Physicists Confirm That We’re Not Living In a Computer Simulation

      Physicists Confirm That We’re Not Living In a Computer Simulation

      Scientists have discovered that it’s impossible to model the physics of our universe on even the biggest computer. What that means is that we’re probably not living in a computersimulation . Theoretical physicists Zohar Ringel and Dmitry Kovrizhin from the University of Oxford and the Hebrew University in Israel applied Monte Carlo simulations (computations used to generate probabilities) to quantum objects moving through various dimensions and found that classical systems cannot create the mathematics necessary to describe quantum systems. They showed this by proving that classical physics can’t erase the sign problem, a particular quirk of quantum Monte ...

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    13. Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to LIGO Black Hole Researchers - The New York Times

      Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to LIGO Black Hole Researchers - The New York Times

      Rainer Weiss of M.I.T. and his Caltech collaborators Kip Thorne and Barry Barish discovered ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves.

      Rainer Weiss, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Kip Thorne and Barry Barish, both of the California Institute of Technology, were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for the discovery of ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves, which were predicted by Albert Einstein a century ago but had never been directly seen.

      In announcing the award, the Royal Swedish Academy called it “a discovery that shook the world.”

      In February 2016 ...

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    14. Energy demands in developing nations fuels storage technology

      Energy demands in developing nations fuels storage technology

      - The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that energy demands from developing countries are going to grow by about 41 percent between now and 2040. By that year, these nations will be using 65 percent of the world’s total energy supply. Cambridge - The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that energy demands from developing countries are going to grow by about 41 percent between now and 2040. By that year, these nations will be using 65 percent of the world’s total energy supply. In the world's developing countries, the EIA is seeing strong economic growth, increased access ...

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      Mentions: solar energy
    15. Hadassah Doctor Brings New Hope to Cystic Fibrosis Patients

      Hadassah Doctor Brings New Hope to Cystic Fibrosis Patients

      Twenty five years ago, Dr. Batsheva Kerem and Dr. Eitan Kerem made a significant contribution to the scientific world’s understanding of genetic mutations and cystic fibrosis. Together—with their medical-research teams—they mapped the genetic mutation profile of cystic fibrosis among different Jewish ethnic groups in Israel. Since then, life expectancy for individuals with cystic fibrosis has shifted dramatically, thanks in part to their medical and genetic research and ongoing commitment to fighting the disease. These Israeli doctors, long married, represent two of the world’s major cystic fibrosis research centers: the Hadassah Medical Organization and Hebrew University. Today ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    16. Plunging sperm counts provoke alarm

      Plunging sperm counts provoke alarm

      Although falling male sperm counts have been reported in the developed world since 1992, the first systematic review and meta-analysis of sperm count trends was only published recently by Hagai Levine and others in Human Reproduction Update. This latest research analysed 185 studies involving nearly 43,000 men who provided semen samples from 1973 to 2011. The researchers found a 54.2 per cent drop in sperm concentration (number of sperm per millilitre) and a 59.3 per cent drop in total sperm count (total number of sperm in ejaculate) over the past 40 years among men from North America ...

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    17. 4,000-Year-Old Jar of Headless Toads Discovered in Jerusalem Burial

      4,000-Year-Old Jar of Headless Toads Discovered in Jerusalem Burial

      In one of the rock-cut tombs, archaeologists made a rare discovery: a jar full of bones from nine headless toads. The toads had been decapitated before they were buried with the dead, possibly as a way to prepare the animals to be "eaten." Finding a tomb that's been sealed for thousands of years is always a treat for archaeologists —especially when that tomb contains a jar of headless toads. That's what archaeologists discovered inside a 4,000-year-old burial in Jerusalem, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced yesterday (Sept. 25). The excavators think the jar might have been a ...

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      Mentions: archaeology
    18. Over the rainbow » J-Wire

      Over the rainbow » J-Wire

      Visiting Professor Wayne Horowitz from Hebrew University amazed his audience with his lecture on rainbows held at North Shore Temple Emanuel. Wayne told how the biblical story of the Flood had its origins in the misty Sumerian past, where rainbows more often than not portended disaster. He then linked the story with native traditions, such as the Gwich’in narrative of ‘The Boy in the Moon’ of Arctic Canada, where, curiously, they speak a language derived from Sumerian. The talk was co-sponsored by Macquarie and Hebrew Universities. Dr Gil Davis, Director of Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Macquarie University, introduced Wayne ...

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      Mentions: archaeology
    19. Atox Bio Awarded Next Milestone-based Option by BARDA to Support Continued Development of

      Atox Bio Awarded Next Milestone-based Option by BARDA to Support Continued Development of

      "We appreciate and continue to benefit from BARDA's ongoing support in the development of Reltecimod as a novel, host-based, immunomodulatory therapy to treat severe infections," said Dan Teleman, Chief Executive Officer of Atox Bio. "We have a very collaborative partnership with BARDA and look forward to continuing to work together." Reltecimod (AB103) is a rationally designed peptide that binds to the CD28 co-stimulatory receptor to modulate the host's immune response to severe infections. By limiting, but not inhibiting, the body's acute inflammatory response, Reltecimod helps control the cytokine storm that could quickly lead to morbidity and mortality ...

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      Mentions: Yissum
    20. No woman had been named dean of the medical faculty since it was opened

      No woman had been named dean of the medical faculty since it was opened

      For the first time since the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s medical faculty was established in 1949, a woman has been named as its head. Prof. Dina Ben-Yehuda will be the second woman to head an Israeli medical school, after Prof. Rivka Carmi – now president of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev – was named dean of BGU’s Faculty of Health Sciences in 2000. Ben-Yehuda, director of hematology at the Hadassah University Medical Center, will take office as the 23rd dean of Hebrew University’s medical faculty on October 1. She will succeed Prof. David Lichtstein, who held the position for ...

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    21. Chinese millionaire to set up artificial intelligence lab in Haifa

      Chinese millionaire to set up artificial intelligence lab in Haifa

      Zong Qinghou, the CEO of one of China’s largest companies, announced plans to set up a research center at the University of Haifa focusing on artificial intelligence. The Chinese Academy of Sciences will also be a research partner. Zong will provide the AI center with at least $10 million over five years, the research partners announced at a signing event on Tuesday, with much of the funding going to construct laboratories and obtain high-end equipment, the University of Haifa’s President Ron Robin said. “For us, this is a game-changer. We get recognition by a major Chinese investor, that ...

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