1. Articles in category: News

    49-72 of 107 « 1 2 3 4 5 »
    1. One drug could treat Alzheimer’s, MS, Crohn’s and more

      One drug could treat Alzheimer’s, MS, Crohn’s and more

      Could one drug effectively treat incurable inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis as well as neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer’s disease?

      Yes, says Prof. David Naor, speaking with ISRAEL21c at the Lautenberg Center for General and Tumor Immunology in Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem.

      All these diseases, he explains, are associated with pathological amyloid proteins that could be neutralized by the 5-mer peptide Naor has spent the last 10 years researching and developing with the support of the university’s Yissum technology-transfer company, the Israeli government and Spherium Biomed of Spain ...

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    2. 3 Israeli universities in top 50 of Times Higher Education Asia Rankings

      3 Israeli universities in top 50 of Times Higher Education Asia Rankings

      Tel Aviv University, the Hebrew University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology all ranked in the top 50 in the 2018 Times Higher Education Asia University Rankings released this week.

      Tel Aviv University ranked 25th in Asia, down three spots from last years, making it the highest-rated Israeli institution in the Asia rankings, while the Hebrew University of Jerusalem ranked 27th and the Technion came in 41st.

      Also in the rankings, the University of Haifa ranked 100th while Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beersheba was No. 104.

      These are the sixth annual Asia University Rankings published by the Times ...

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    3. The Argument Against Quantum Computers

      The Argument Against Quantum Computers

      ixteen years ago, on a cold February day at Yale University, a poster caught Gil Kalai’s eye. It advertised a series of lectures by Michel Devoret, a well-known expert on experimental efforts in quantum computing. The talks promised to explore the question “Quantum Computer: Miracle or Mirage?” Kalai expected a vigorous discussion of the pros and cons of quantum computing. Instead, he recalled, “the skeptical direction was a little bit neglected.” He set out to explore that skeptical view himself.

      Today, Kalai, a mathematician at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, is one of the most prominent of a loose group ...

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    4. Merck opens Jerusalem innovation lab

      Merck opens Jerusalem innovation lab

      The laboratory is part of Merck’s commitment to Israel, collaboration with the Hebrew University, and development efforts in nanotechnologies and materials.

      Merck Group, the German pharmaceutical and life sciences company, today inaugurated a technology innovation laboratory at its subsidiary Qlight Nanotech in Jerusalem, hosted on the Hebrew University’s Edmund J. Safra Campus. The laboratory is part of Merck’s commitment to Israel, collaboration with the Hebrew University, and development efforts in nanotechnologies and materials.

      Qlight Nanotech was established through Yissum, the technology transfer company of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, partnering Prof. Uri Banin of The Hebrew University ...

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    5. Can Israeli scientists save Darwin’s finches?

      Can Israeli scientists save Darwin’s finches?

      The Galápagos Islands are known for their unique animal species – giant tortoises, iguanas and sea lions – but none are more legendary than the group of birds known as Darwin’s finches.

      Early discoveries from these tiny songbirds, which measure no bigger than a sparrow, are credited for having helped Charles Darwin develop his theory of evolution by natural selection. Now, 11 of the 13 finch species found in the Galápagos are in danger of extinction due to a parasitic fly’s fatal impact on the populations.

      A research team from the Hebrew University’s Robert H. Smith Faculty ...

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    6. Pollution’s impact on weather, crops worse than once thought

      Pollution’s impact on weather, crops worse than once thought

      Even the tiniest of particles from human emissions can fuel powerful storms and influence weather and crops much more than previously thought, according to new research published January 26 in the journal Science. The study focuses on the power of manmade aerosol emissions to grow rain clouds and intensify storms. These particles come from urban and industrial air pollution, wildfires and other sources. While scientists have known that these particles play an important role in shaping weather and climate, the new study shows that even the smallest aerosol particles can have an outsize effect, creating more severe thunderstorms, which in ...

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    7. The pomegranate potential

      The pomegranate potential

      Pomegranates are known to contain powerful antioxidants that fight the oxygen free radicals that cause inflammation, accelerated aging of the tissues, the activation of harmful genes within DNA and an overloaded immune system. Various herbs, spices such as turmeric and teas, as well as dark chocolate, pecans, fruits like blueberries, goji berries, elderberries, cranberries, blackberries and vegetables and pulses like sweet potatoes, broccoli, artichoke and kidney beans also reduce the effects of oxidative damage in the body.

      The leading health problems facing us today – including conditions like heart disease, cancer, dementia and other neurological diseases – have been linked to increased ...

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    8. Meet Hebrew University's top cannabis researcher – J.

      Meet Hebrew University's top cannabis researcher – J.

      Attorney General Jeff Sessions unwittingly has become a key supporter of Israel’s thriving medical marijuana industry. Just ask cannabis researcher Yossi Tam.

      Speaking in Palo Alto this week, the Israeli expert on cannabinoids — chemicals that give the cannabis plant its medical and recreational properties — said anti-pot politics in the United States have allowed Israel’s medical marijuana industry to thrive. Israel even has attracted some of the top American researchers, he said.

      Israel even has attracted some of the top American researchers, he said. After all, in the U.S., marijuana remains a Schedule 1 drug, alongside heroin and ...

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    9. Why Israel rocks at commercializing academic innovations

      Why Israel rocks at commercializing academic innovations

      It’s no coincidence that Harvard and UCLA chose experienced Israelis to direct their technology-transfer offices. Cash-strapped universities urgently need to streamline the transfer of inventions from lab bench to market, and Israeli TTOs have a remarkable track record of generating more revenue from IP sales than any other country except the United States. “Universities are reinventing themselves as micro environments for innovation and entrepreneurship. A university that can’t demonstrate its impact on industry and the marketplace will become less relevant in the future,” says Benjamin Soffer, chairman of Israel Tech Transfer Network. Soffer, who frequently hosts TTO officials ...

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    10. Martin Buber Supported MLK In Letter To LBJ

      Martin Buber Supported MLK In Letter To LBJ

      Just before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the National Library of Israel has unveiled a timely letter from its Martin Buber Archive. In 1965 Buber, just before his death, joined a group of Hebrew University professors in writing to President Lyndon B. Johnson to emphasize the importance of the end of King’s brief incarceration following a march on Selma, Alabama. King had received the Nobel Peace Prize the previous year. “We are taking the liberty to express our deep satisfaction that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is now again a free man and can continue his righteous fight for ...

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      Mentions: Humanities
    11. Israeli auto-tech, robotics, photonics light up Las Vegas

      Israeli auto-tech, robotics, photonics light up Las Vegas

      Intel’s blockbuster acquisition of Israel’s Mobileye last year is finally bearing public fruit: The combined companies unveiled their first autonomous vehicle at the Consumer Technology Association’s flagship event, CES, in Las Vegas on January 9-12. Mobileye develops the sensors and software that allow a car to know where it is in relation to its surroundings. That key component for the coming self-driving car age was the main reason Intel bought the company in March 2017 for more than $15 billion. Prof. Amnon Shashua, Mobileye’s CEO and now a senior VP at Intel, shared the CES stage ...

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    12. Albert Einstein Collection Heads to Taiwan

      Albert Einstein Collection Heads to Taiwan

      January 11, 2018-For the first time in history, the Albert Einstein Archives at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (HU) will be on display in Asia.  The exhibit, Albert Einstein: Life in Four Dimensions, curated by Avi Muller, will open January 12 at the National Chiang Kei-Shek Memorial Hall in Taipei, Taiwan.  Scores of original Einstein memorabilia will be on display, including his 1921 Nobel Prize, handwritten pages from the Theory of  Relativity, letters exchanged with Sigmund Freud, family members and lovers, and the physicist’s own vinyl record collection. 

      Taiwan is the first stop on the Einstein exhibit’s Asia ...

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      Mentions: Humanities
    13. Unprecedented Security Measures Expected in New York's Times Square This New Year's Eve

      Unprecedented Security Measures Expected in New York's Times Square This New Year's Eve

      While everyone knows New York City's Times Square will be the scene of one big party this New Year's Eve, police know it's also a big target for terrorists. City officials said the standard security measures will, of course, be in place, like sand trucks and blocker vehicles. But after two terror attacks in NYC since Halloween, more efforts are being focused on trying to catch and prevent an attack, even though no credible threat has been found. For instance, parking garages will get increased scrutiny. In recent years, the NYPD had been closing some parking garages ...

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    14. 13 of the biggest health breakthroughs in Israel in 2017

      13 of the biggest health breakthroughs in Israel in 2017

      An Israeli researcher devised a synthetic compound to disable the enzymes that allow cancer cells to metastasize. When cancer cells leave the primary tumor and spread to other organs, they reprogram their energy-generating system in order to survive in harsh conditions with a shortage of nutrients like glucose. Prof. Uri Nir of Bar-Ilan University identified an enzyme called FerT in the energy-generating mitochondria of metastatic cancer cells – an enzyme normally only found in sperm cells (which need to function outside the body they came from). When he targeted FerT in lab mice, the malignant cells soon died. Using advanced chemical ...

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    15. How the Unconscious Mind Picks Out Faces in a Crowd

      How the Unconscious Mind Picks Out Faces in a Crowd

      December 18, 2017 — Imagine you’re walking down a busy area like Times Square in New York.  There are tons of people around.  As you make your way through the crowd, your brain notices several faces but ignores the rest.  Why is that?  What are the processes that determine which faces our brain “chooses” to see and those it allows to fade into the background?

      Today, a new study published in the prestigious journal Nature Human Behavior by Professor Ran Hassin, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)’s James Marshall Chair in Social Psychology and member of its Federmann Center ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    16. This One Simple Daily Habit Could Help You Live Longer

      This One Simple Daily Habit Could Help You Live Longer

      ​Want more birthdays ahead? Go outside.

      That’s the conclusion of a recent study that looked at the daily habits of more than 3,000 adults between ages 70 to 90, over a 25-year period. Researchers divided the subjects into three groups, based on how often they left their homes: daily, 2 to 5 times per week, and less than once per week. (See what ONE daily ritual these 5 fitness pros over 50 never skip.)

      When mortality was assessed in the later years of the study, researchers found that those who went outside every day were at the lowest ...
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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    17. Tiny fish swims to Israel to help unlock mystery of aging

      Tiny fish swims to Israel to help unlock mystery of aging

      The search for the proverbial fountain of youth is moving underwater. Experimental biologist Itamar Harel, returning to Israel this spring from a post-doc at Stanford University School of Medicine, will establish an aging research lab focused on the tiny East African turquoise killifish, the shortest-lived vertebrate that can be cultivated in the laboratory easily. Gleaning insights into human aging from a fish that lives an average of four to six months sounds counterintuitive. But the East African turquoise killifish has an aging progression remarkably similar to ours, making it perfect for studying human aging in a rapid timeframe. “In the ...

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    18. Archaeologists uncover bittersweet end of 1,800-year-old Tiberias menorah

      Archaeologists uncover bittersweet end of 1,800-year-old Tiberias menorah

      Why would Crusaders decorate a staircase with the carving of a menorah? This archaeological mystery — almost two millennia in the making — was recently solved, seven years after the Jewish symbol was discovered in a Hebrew University excavation of ancient Tiberias. The massive menorah, originally carved on a basalt tomb door, is tangible evidence of the city’s dramatic historical periods in the past centuries, under the world’s three major monotheistic religions.

      The 68×78-centimeter (27×31 inch) seven-stemmed menorah was uncovered in a dig led by the Hebrew University’s Dr. Katya Tzitrin Silverman, which has been ongoing since ...

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      Mentions: Humanities
    19. Honorary Doctorate Ceremony for His All Holiness | Hebrew University Campaign

      Honorary Doctorate Ceremony for His All Holiness | Hebrew University Campaign

      On December 6, 2017 His All Holiness Bartholomew I, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople received an Honorary Doctorate from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

      The event was attended by a wide array of religious leaders, ambassadors and dignitaries. The presentation of the honorary degree was followed by an address from His All Holiness:

       

      His All Holiness the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople, popularly known as the "Green Pope,” was appointed as the primary spiritual leader of the world's approximately 300 million  Orthodox  Christians on November 2nd, 1991. Since then he has pursued a constant vision of spiritual revival; of ...

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    20. James Patterson and Einstein archivists creating new series - The Washington Post

      James Patterson and Einstein archivists creating new series - The Washington Post

      Already co-writing a political thriller with former President Bill Clinton, James Patterson is now set for a collaboration with the managers of Albert Einstein’s archives.

      The best-selling and prolific novelist is developing a series for middle schoolers inspired by Einstein’s scientific discoveries. In a licensing deal with the Einstein archive, Little Brown will publish the first of three planned books, currently untitled, next fall. The release will come through the author’s own JIMMY Patterson children’s imprint.

      “I love the idea of introducing Einstein and the ideas of science to millions of kids around the world,” says ...

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    21. Why teamwork is better than attempting lone heroism in science

      Why teamwork is better than attempting lone heroism in science
      This article originally appeared on Massive.

      MASSIVE_logoThe best way for scientists — or anybody, really — to address shortcomings after experiencing failure is teamwork. And never has that been more clearly apparent than in the story of Doxil, the first nanomedicine, which failed multiple times before a resourceful team cracked the code.

      Nanomedicine is the application of nanoscale technologies (think about it as really, really tiny pieces of matter — 10,000 times smaller than a strand of hair or 100 times smaller than a red blood cell) for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and study of disease and human health. It’s pretty ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    22. Israeli serial startup stars of blockchain tech return with QEDit, a zero-knowledge proof diligence tool | TechCrunch

      Israeli serial startup stars of blockchain tech return with QEDit, a zero-knowledge proof diligence tool | TechCrunch

      Leveraging some “mind boggling math” introduced as an update onto the Ethereum blockchain only a few months ago, QEDit is launching its product on our Battlefield stage at TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin.

      The company, which takes its name from the Latin phrase quod erat demonstrandum (which was what would have been demonstrated) relies on the principle of zero knowledge proofs to provide audit and due diligence services for financial institutions.

      One of the problems that’s been slowing down blockchain adoption in businesses is how to share information based on proprietary data. Companies don’t want to share a lot of ...

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    23. At Stanford, Israeli brain scientist thinks thoughts about thinking – J.

      At Stanford, Israeli brain scientist thinks thoughts about thinking – J.

      Ask Adi Mizrahi if he loves his work and his answer is a no-brainer.

      “I’m absolutely convinced I have the best job in the world,” said Mizrahi, a neurobiologist, award-winning scientist and the director of the Hebrew University’s Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences.

      Mizrahi, 47, now on sabbatical at Stanford University, is taking a year to talk to other scientists and learn about cutting-edge research techniques he can bring back to Israel. It’s part of his philosophy of interdisciplinary science, which he believes is crucial for understanding the brain.

      “I think it is a ...

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      Mentions: Medicine/Health
    24. Ancient Temple Built by the Descendent of A Vast Biblical Kingdom Discovered by Israeli Military Drones

      Ancient Temple Built by the Descendent of A Vast Biblical Kingdom Discovered by Israeli Military Drones

      BY  ON 11/30/17 AT 7:32 AM

      Experts working at the Horvat ‘Amuda site have said the drone images allowed them to pinpoint their dig.

      Drones flying over a military training area in Israel have revealed the location of an ancient temple built by the biblical Idumean people some 2,200 years ago.

      Subsequent excavations of the structure, spotted in military aerial photographs, uncovered a number of cultic jars and vessels and a rare hellenistic altar for the burning of incense decorated with the image of a bull.

      Experts working at the Horvat ‘Amuda site have ...

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