1. Articles from Phys.org

    phys.org

  2. 1-7 of 7
    1. Forget sperm and eggs, researchers have created embryo stem cells from skin cells

      Forget sperm and eggs, researchers have created embryo stem cells from skin cells

      A new, groundbreaking study by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. This work has significant implications for modelling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.

      As published in Cell Stem Cell, Dr. Yossi Buganim of HU's Department of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research and his team discovered a set of genes capable of transforming murine  into all three of the cell types that comprise the early embryo: the ...

      Read Full Article
    2. Astrophysicists predict Earth-like planet in star system only 16 light years away

      Astrophysicists predict Earth-like planet in star system only 16 light years away

      The team investigated the star system Gliese 832 for additional exoplanets residing between the two currently known alien worlds in this system. Their computations revealed that an additional Earth-like planet with a dynamically stable configuration may be residing at a distance ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 astronomical unit (AU) from the star. "According to our calculations, this hypothetical alien world would probably have a mass between 1 to 15 Earth's masses," said the lead author Suman Satyal, UTA physics researcher, lecturer and laboratory supervisor. The paper is co-authored by John Griffith, UTA undergraduate student and long-time UTA ...

      Read Full Article
    3. Collagen in cartilage tissues behaves like liquid crystals in a smart phone screen

      Collagen in cartilage tissues behaves like liquid crystals in a smart phone screen

      The collagen changes its crystallinity in response to physical forces, so the ordered arrangement in collagen molecules of the cartilage in our knees may be flipping from one structural state to another with every step we take. The results, published in the journal ACS Nano, cast new light on how cartilage is able to withstand the demanding mechanical environment of the joint and may eventually help to explain why cartilage breaks down with ageing or arthritis. Dr Himadri Gupta, from QMUL's School of Engineering and Materials Science, said: "Pain and reduced mobility due to joint diseases currently affects over ...

      Read Full Article
    4. Team redefines cosmic velocity web

      Team redefines cosmic velocity web

      The cosmic velocity web analysis was led by Daniel Pomarede, Atomic Energy Center, France, with the collaboration of Helene Courtois at the University of Lyon, France; Yehuda Hoffman at the Hebrew University, Israel; and Brent Tully at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy. "With the motions of the galaxies, we can infer where all of the mass is located: the galaxies and the 5 times more abundant transparent matter (usually wrongly called dark matter). This total gravitating mass, together with the expansion of the universe, is responsible for the motions that create the architecture of the universe. The ...

      Read Full Article
    5. A way to stabilize haploidy in animal cells

      A way to stabilize haploidy in animal cells

      The emergence in recent years of the first mammalian haploid cell lines has raised great expectations in the scientific community. Despite their potential, these cultures present some issues that complicate their use because haploidy is unstable and can be lost quickly. The Genomic Instability Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has offered an explanation of this phenomenon and proposes a way to overcome it. This work has been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). With the exception of the sperm or ovules, cells contain two sets of chromosomes, one from each ...

      Read Full Article
    6. AI, crowdsourcing combine to close 'analogy gap'

      AI, crowdsourcing combine to close 'analogy gap'

      Specifically, they developed a way for computers to find analogies—comparisons between sometimes disparate methods and problems that highlight underlying similarities. As anyone who enjoyed watching TV's MacGyver disarm a missile with a paperclip or staunch a sulfuric acid leak with a chocolate bar could tell you, analogies can provide critical insights and inspiration for problem solving. Tapping huge databases of inventions could spur innovation, but doing so without the help of analogies is, well, like finding a needle in a haystack. Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon and Hebrew University cracked the analogy problem by combining crowdsourcing and a ...

      Read Full Article
    7. Rapid 3-D printing in water using novel hybrid nanoparticles

      Rapid 3-D printing in water using novel hybrid nanoparticles

      Hybrid nanoparticles as photoinitiators. a. Electron microscope image of hybrid nanocrystal. The inset shows a schematic of semiconductor nanorod with a metal tip. b. Bucky ball structure produced by rapid 3D printing in water using HNPs as photoinitiators. c. Spiral printed with HNPs by two photon printer providing high resolution features. Credit: Pawar et al Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have developed a new type of photoinitiator for three-dimensional (3-D) printing in water. These novel nanoparticles could allow for the creation of bio-friendly 3-D printed structures, further the development of biomedical accessories ...

      Read Full Article
    1-7 of 7
  1. Categories

    1. News:

      News, Placeholder